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Here are the photos I'm currently exhibiting at the Saratoga Community Federal Credit Union (23 Division St, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866) in the Saratoga Arts Art in Public Spaces program.  These photos are for sale--all sales (from Jan 8th-Jan 29) are handled through Saratoga Arts; for purchase information, please contact Saratoga Arts' office at 518-584-4132, M-F, 9-5. 

A note about how I chose photos for this exhibition. The Saratoga Community Federal Credit Union has very tight space for displaying art, mostly within a customer waiting area with different colored walls, and one larger wall behind a desk. The waiting area is small, which is an opportunity to choose photos that work best when viewed up close. But the space behind the desk allows for a larger piece that almost has to be viewed from a greater distance. Also, the choice of art was dictated by the background color of the walls (not usually a factor in an art gallery), as well as pieces that fit well together. 

For the more intimate waiting area, I chose pieces that often don't get viewed up close (for example, the metal scrap heap in Galway, Ireland). There's a lot of detail there. The same is true of the threesome (graffiti on the tower at Skidmore College's North Woods; coal sand on the beach at Robin Hood's Bay, Yorkshire; charcoal sand from Block Island, RI)--up close you see details that aren't apparent when viewed from afar. The threesome also was deliberately chosen because of the background color, so they work together with different locations but similar palettes.

I also wanted a mix of abstract and natural, because that reflects the dual nature of my photography. And because the bank is situated in the middle of Saratoga, it made sense to choose several photos that were taken in and around Saratoga. The largest photo (18 x 24) is situated behind the desk just to the right of the entrance. It's a photo of 'herm' from Congress Park, and it's large enough that it can easily be seen from across the customer area. It's flanked by two smaller photos of place in Ireland (I did this in part to counter the miserable weather we are having in Saratoga this winter).

Thanks to Emma Huneck of Saratoga Arts for making this opportunity available to me, and to the staff at the Saratoga Community Federal Credit Union for making me welcome in their bank, and for providing much-needed assistance (and patience) while I mounted the display.


 I was fascinated by this pile of metal scraps I found on one of the docks in Galway Harbour (Ireland). One of the advantages of displaying this photo in a small space is that one can look for items to think about what they might have been in the real world. Several mattress or car seat springs here, flywheels, radiators, fans, transmissions, etc. It does remind us how much waste we accumulate—but at least this stuff can be recycled!  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

I was fascinated by this pile of metal scraps I found on one of the docks in Galway Harbour (Ireland). One of the advantages of displaying this photo in a small space is that one can look for items to think about what they might have been in the real world. Several mattress or car seat springs here, flywheels, radiators, fans, transmissions, etc. It does remind us how much waste we accumulate—but at least this stuff can be recycled!  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 


 This was taken in the late fall in the North Woods of Skidmore College. I’m assuming it’s a winter berry (although most of the wild winter berries seem to have much smaller berries, so it might not be). This one appealed to me not just for the coloration, but also for the design of the berries with their orangey leaves—almost getting ready to parachute down to the ground. How they weren’t already eaten by birds amazes me.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

This was taken in the late fall in the North Woods of Skidmore College. I’m assuming it’s a winter berry (although most of the wild winter berries seem to have much smaller berries, so it might not be). This one appealed to me not just for the coloration, but also for the design of the berries with their orangey leaves—almost getting ready to parachute down to the ground. How they weren’t already eaten by birds amazes me.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 


 I bought a baby twist locust for my garden several years ago, and after settling in with little growth for the first three years, now is making up for lost time. This is new growth in the spring, it puts out just a few leaves as it spurts upwards, then fills them in later. It is rightly called “twist” because the branches go off in all directions. Not sure about the “baby” because I’ve seen ones in England that are at least 80 feet high. What I like about this photo is its Asian look and feel—you could imagine it on a vase, or tapestry.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

I bought a baby twist locust for my garden several years ago, and after settling in with little growth for the first three years, now is making up for lost time. This is new growth in the spring, it puts out just a few leaves as it spurts upwards, then fills them in later. It is rightly called “twist” because the branches go off in all directions. Not sure about the “baby” because I’ve seen ones in England that are at least 80 feet high. What I like about this photo is its Asian look and feel—you could imagine it on a vase, or tapestry.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 


 One of the things I was looking forward to with the purchase of the Canon 80D and the 70-300mm lens was to be able to photograph birds in my garden. And of course hummingbirds feeding on my flowers (this one is a Turtlehead) would be a particular thrill. Of course, I never realized just how difficult it would be. This is just one of several hundred shots that actually put the hummingbird in the frame, and it took several hours of patiently waiting as still as possible until the right moment. I think it was worth it.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

One of the things I was looking forward to with the purchase of the Canon 80D and the 70-300mm lens was to be able to photograph birds in my garden. And of course hummingbirds feeding on my flowers (this one is a Turtlehead) would be a particular thrill. Of course, I never realized just how difficult it would be. This is just one of several hundred shots that actually put the hummingbird in the frame, and it took several hours of patiently waiting as still as possible until the right moment. I think it was worth it.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 


 These are hydrangea flowers in the Fall. Having stood upright since blooming, in the Fall they face downwards, offering an opportunity capture their brittle stems and beautifully patterned undersides. It makes such a statement about the beauty of Fall colors, too.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

These are hydrangea flowers in the Fall. Having stood upright since blooming, in the Fall they face downwards, offering an opportunity capture their brittle stems and beautifully patterned undersides. It makes such a statement about the beauty of Fall colors, too.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 


 Cliffs of Moher, photographed this last October on a visit to Ireland. The first day we visited, there was almost hurricane wind and rain pelting us horizontally, with almost nil visibility. We decided to visit again on the next day, which turned out to be sunny, mild, and perfect for photographing these incredible cliffs.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

Cliffs of Moher, photographed this last October on a visit to Ireland. The first day we visited, there was almost hurricane wind and rain pelting us horizontally, with almost nil visibility. We decided to visit again on the next day, which turned out to be sunny, mild, and perfect for photographing these incredible cliffs.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 


 This is a photograph of Lough Inagh in County Galway, in Ireland. We were touring Connemara, and returning in the late afternoon to Galway, when this scene just appeared. I just shot it through the back window of the car we were passengers in. Pure luck to have caught the sun streaming down behind the clouds..  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

This is a photograph of Lough Inagh in County Galway, in Ireland. We were touring Connemara, and returning in the late afternoon to Galway, when this scene just appeared. I just shot it through the back window of the car we were passengers in. Pure luck to have caught the sun streaming down behind the clouds..  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 


 This is a photo taken on the beach in Robin Hood’s Bay in Yorkshire, England. The black sand comes from the many ships carrying coal that were wrecked on the shore. Do you see a monkey in the darker sand?   ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

This is a photo taken on the beach in Robin Hood’s Bay in Yorkshire, England. The black sand comes from the many ships carrying coal that were wrecked on the shore. Do you see a monkey in the darker sand? 

©2017 Sean Walmsley; 


 This photo was taken on Block Island (RI), but its black sand is charcoal left from fire pits on the beach. To me, it looks like a meteorite, but obviously is just a pebble with the charcoal washed by the tide around it.   ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

This photo was taken on Block Island (RI), but its black sand is charcoal left from fire pits on the beach. To me, it looks like a meteorite, but obviously is just a pebble with the charcoal washed by the tide around it. 

©2017 Sean Walmsley; 


 This is a detail of graffiti at the Water Tower in the North Woods of Skidmore College. I liked its exuberance of paint splatters as well as the overall design and colors.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

This is a detail of graffiti at the Water Tower in the North Woods of Skidmore College. I liked its exuberance of paint splatters as well as the overall design and colors.  ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 


 If you live on Saratoga Springs, NY, most of you will recognize this statue in Congress Park, called a ‘herm’ (or satyr, most likely representing Pan, the Greek god of the forest). This is one of four sculptures in what is called the Palladian Circle. I have been photographing these sculptures over several years, but this shot caught the herm—fortunately—in just the right light.. ©2017 Sean Walmsley; 

If you live on Saratoga Springs, NY, most of you will recognize this statue in Congress Park, called a ‘herm’ (or satyr, most likely representing Pan, the Greek god of the forest). This is one of four sculptures in what is called the Palladian Circle. I have been photographing these sculptures over several years, but this shot caught the herm—fortunately—in just the right light.. ©2017 Sean Walmsley;